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Daily Quotes 47


TWO SIMON GRANT MYSTERIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HIDING THE ELEPHANT – Chapter 47

Another two silent human shapes go past the door, taking no notice of her.

Emma straightens herself slowly, dips her hands into the tank again, presses them cold and wet on the sides of her neck, then on her temples. Then she dips another towel inside and takes it to her patient. There’s some comfort in looking after him. Like a trade-off.

She doesn’t even turn her head when yet another climber makes it through the window.

‘Good job I’ve done my keep-fit, isn’t it. This climb isn’t the easiest thing I’ve ever done. Twice in one night is over and above, to my way of thinking.’ Once inside, Debbie Jones takes off her dark headgear. In the moonlight, her hair looks like a mass of scrunched, silvery metal wire. ‘I’m meant to look after you. The fun’s about to start.’

‘Simon can get hurt,’ Emma objects mechanically.

‘The Boss will get hurt if we don’t do something soon,’ says Debbie calmly. ‘Dancer’s running out of steam.’  She walks over to the bed and puts on the bedside light.

‘Is that wise? The reflection can be seen on the grass.’ Emma’s confidence in this operation went with that stretcher. It tore the thin fabric of the cocoon she’s created for herself up here in this dark womb of lure and lore.

‘Don’t worry about that, love. How’s your patient doing?’

‘He’ll live.’ Emma wants to see this out without onlookers. Bloody hell, the last thing she needs now is to have to put on a brave face for an audience. ‘Nothing’s going to happen here, in this room. Your talents could be better employed someplace else in this operation.’

 

LOCK UP YOUR DAUGHTERS – Chapter 47

Dr. Bennett closed and locked the door to his study. The precaution aimed against casual intrusion. Even if someone had seen him going in, they would have been hardly likely to take much notice of him or wander what he was up to. Their host may have been spending unholy amounts of money each year for their pleasure and entertainment, but he himself had never figured in either in any way. For ten years now he’d been making sure to greet everyone individually on arrival and wish them a safe journey home on departure. In the meantime, he’d be careful never to impose himself on someone for longer than five or ten minutes, keep the conversation strictly limited to inquiries about their comfort and needs, except for smiling at the jokes and saying things as Very droll, Very amusing and How interesting when required.

Only about a week or so ago he had still considered the situation more of a challenge than a threat. With his skill in handling the tricky and the complex on a daily basis he quite naturally expected to find a solution at an acceptable price. A negotiated outcome. He still believed he could achieve the impossible.

But not any longer. The events had overtaken him, the were running away with him and there was damn all he could do.

After the lunch with Simon Hamilton Grant and a brief and pleasant chat with the hotel marketing manager about the dates and costs of an arts exhibition, he drove to Osney. It had been a long time since he visited the cemetery that contained an ever-increasing number of Lostao Crespos. The last time he’d been there was to attend Tita Inez’s funeral, only three months after her brother’s. Someone else must have taken over the care of the graves after Sara had left. They were kept neat and tidy. Deep purple and yellow pansies and small rose bushes thrived under the wayward shade of two ancient weeping willows.

Margot’s headstone was in the shape of the Virgin Mary with child sculpted out of white stone. Tito’s and Rosita’s choice, Gordon’s money.

He didn’t know what he came to the cemetery for. There’s never been anything for him here. He filled the vase made of heavy blue plastic with water from the nearby communal tap and arranged the yellow tulips in it the best he knew how. The vase was a little too tall and only the tips of the sword-like leaves were showing above the rim. He next removed a few leaves from the marble top and the white gravel that formed a path around the grave, wrapped them into the paper the flowers had come in and took it to the wire rubbish basket next to the tap. Back at the grave, he was at a loss. It felt appropriate to take his hat off but the small, narrow wooden bench that served both Margot and Inez was fully in the sun and his shoes were not made for long periods of walking or standing. In fact, his feet have never been designed for long periods of exertion. He compromised by taking his hat off while he said Our Father, the only prayer he knew all the words to, under the shade of the willows, then replaced it and walked around to the bench.

 

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Posted by on 21/01/2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Daily Quotes 46


TWO SIMON GRANT MYSTERIES

HIDING THE ELEPHANT – Chapter 46

It was a beautiful, balmy June night. The night of eighth of June 1978 to be precise. In his heart of hearts he knew he didn’t need to spend the night revising. But years of habit kept him reading. Hours went by. He sat by the open French window picking up the books and notes alternatively in a carefully pre-planned order.  It was just past midnight when he poured himself another cup of coffee. The biscuit tin was empty, so he made himself a piece of toast and spread Gabriella’s home made blackberry jam over it. Gabriella had said blackberry was good for the brain cells. Eve said brain cells my foot, and to watch out for constipation.

Then he tackled one of the more involved test cases. Buerk v Eastman and Son, the Monumental Stone Masons. The judge found for the masons even if they had put the stone on the wrong grave. The logic of the judgment was perfect if one could cite all the points of law in the right order.

He frowned at the noise growing louder from the direction of Nathan Brook. The term ‘love birds’ was total nonsense. Those creatures squabbled and fought as much as people. When he’d first moved into the flat, the squawking from the Nathan Grove side used to wake him up frequently at any time of night.

LOCK UP YOUR DAUGHTERS – Chapter 46

Little Manor, Spratton

Saturday, 24. 07. 1993

Jennifer Spriggs looked good in her black outfit. The minimum of makeup brought out the blueness of her eyes and the fullness of her lips. When Grant finally managed to track her down she looked bored stiff by Bunty de Wilde’s long and detailed narrative about his translations of legal and ecclesiastical manuscripts from medieval Flemish, but as soon as they were left on their own admitted that she’d been avoiding him on purpose.

‘It wouldn’t do for the two of us to be seen to confab too much. No one’s talking as it is,’ she grumbled.

‘Did you expect them to?’

She smiled and shook her head. It was a very pretty smile and a very pretty head. ‘It’s Gordon Bennett who’s let me down. I expected him to be either all over me or avoid me, but he’s doing neither. A perfect host. A little bit nervous and pernickety, jumpy and abstracted, but that’s it. Which perhaps shouldn’t surprise me. He’s been entertaining this lot since last night and has another twenty-four hours of it. Why is he doing it? Why the hassle, the expense? I know he’s got a bit of a reputation for showing off, but …’ she looked up at him questioningly. ‘Any bright ideas?’

‘Only very vague and most certainly not very bright,’ he smiled back at her. ‘This is the tenth anniversary of Marcus Smithers’ suicide. Dr. Bennett started these gatherings ten years ago. One can’t but wonder.’

‘It was a suicide,’ she said thoughtfully. ‘Of course, there’s suicide and then there’s suicide…’

‘Which is more or less what Rufus Smithers said. There’s certainly some method in his madness, but he’s not saying what it is. He’s talking of fortresses, moats and secret entrances.’

‘Probably just trying to rattle the old rattle snake,’ Spriggs dismissed Smithers with no hesitation. ‘I wish him luck. Bennett is cleverer than that.’

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Posted by on 20/01/2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Daily Quotes 45


TWO SIMON GRANT MYSTERIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HIDING THE ELEPHANT – Chapter 45

Grant made a fast turn and drove to Pychley House.

‘I don’t understand.’ Soaked through, Unsworth was walking up and down the wooden porch at the back of the house. ‘Why are they doing this? They’re ruining the garden. What are they looking for? What bloody credit card?’

‘The officers are acting on information received, sir,’ said Debbie. ‘The Inspector and I are here on a completely different business.’

‘Your wife’s credit card, Mr. Unsworth. It’s been used.’ Grant would have preferred to conduct the conversation indoors, but Unsworth wasn’t offering.

Unsworth stopped in his tracks. ‘That means she’s alive and well. Where is she? Where was the card used?’

‘We don’t know where Mrs. Unsworth is.’ Grant produced a photocopy of the statement. ‘There’s a little problem, I’m afraid. The card’s been used in London, in Tower Hamlets to be exact, just before one o’clock in the afternoon of Friday, 16th October. If the convoy left at eleven in the morning as you’ve said, they should have been inDoverby that time, waiting for the ferry. Possibly even on the ferry if they’d planned it properly.’

Unsworth’s face was reddening in stages.

‘You told me you’d waved them off.’ Grant added when the vet failed to answer.

‘I wish I had. I wish to God I had.’ Unsworth resumed his walk, pacing around in a small, irregular circles.

‘Shall we go in? You could do with a cup of tea, sir,’ Debbie suggested quietly.

Unsworth nodded but continued his roaming at the same pace. ‘I didn’t wait. I was going to, but they were buggering about, waiting for someone, Lord knows who or what. Lennie knew I was pressed for time. She insisted that I should leave. She insisted.’

 

LOCK UP YOUR DAUGHTERS – Chapter 45

Dressed in light brown trousers made of heavy Shantung and a dark brown, short-sleeved noil shirt among a sea of dinner jackets and black ties, the gargoyle stood in the middle of the terrace, finishing a glass of red wine. The wavy, grizzled hair was collar length at the back, nonexistent at the top. The deficiency turned the once oval-shaped face into an asymmetrical triangle, with the eyebrows dominating over the button nose and large, full lips.

‘Ah,’ he raised the empty glass, ‘the prodigal returns. And,’ he bowed deeply to Pippa, getting hold of her hand and bringing it to his lips, ‘with a trophy wife on his arm. If I were les well mannered I’d say you two emitted an unmistakeable post-coital glow.’

‘We’ve got to talk, Alex.’ Somewhere along the way Grant had decided on start-as-you-mean-to-go-on approach.

Carroll winked at Pippa. ‘You’ll be glad to hear that his charm school has been closed down. Whatever’s made you marry a policeman, my lady?’

‘The prospect of a pension and long, lonely nights in front of the telly was too attractive to resist.’ Pippa took her time over freeing her hand, but free it she did. ‘I assume the padlock has been taken off the drinks cabinet by now?’

‘You assume right. Follow me.’

Simon let them walk off. Dr. Bennett in a black dinner jacket and a hat that looked dangerously like a boater appeared at the door and was heading in his direction in short, mincy steps and with a thin smile on his face. He had people with him, though, so Simon changed his mind and caught up with Alex and Pippa. Half way across the lawn Alex offered to re-introduce him to his soon to be ex-wife and her baby boyfriend. Angel, dressed in something much too short and embarrassingly low cut, and with a magnificent crown of hair surrounding a pasty, olive-shaped face, replied angrily that Casper Ransome was neither a baby nor her boyfriend. She stretched herself on her toes for a long, wet kiss on Grant’s cheek, and gave Pippa an undisguised once-over while waiting for introduction.

Several people, taking it in turns to shake his hand, pat him on the shoulder or plant kisses somewhere on or in the vicinity of his face, people who expected to be recognised, addressed him as HG, an abbreviation generated in the early years by Kevin Corrigan that had been generally accepted as Grant’s student identity. He was also told he looked well and wasn’t his wife lovely, absolutely lovely. The lovely wife was first hanging on his arm, repeating pleased to meet you and oh, I’ve heard so much about you to faces and names Grant was at pains to link and make sense of. Then she ebbed away and he was hearing himself say yes, it’s wonderful to be back, and you don’t seem to be doing badly yourself and returning backslaps and kisses as appropriate.

 

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Posted by on 19/01/2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Daily Quotes 44


TWO SIMON GRANT MYSTERIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HIDING THE ELEPHANT – Chapter 44

‘What’s eating you?’ Grant was refusing to get used to a grouchy, testy Debs. Why today of all days when his heart was singing and his head was in the clouds?

‘D’you think it’s easy to obtain a fistful of unspecified search warrants at this time on a Saturday morning? D’you think I have no life of my own?’

‘Have you?’

Debbie’s face grew purple and she shot a quick glance towards the galley. Tully was running hot water into the sink.  There was a whitish mist of steam trailing into the office from behind the partition.

She shook her head. ‘Do I hell. Young Tibblets are being shipped off to their maternal grandmother for two weeks. Mrs. Tibb has booked an expensive second honeymoon. Or is it the third?’

‘I’m sorry.’ He meant it.

‘You don’t give a fuck. May not happen, though. Tibb’s in a bit of bother. Someone collapsed at the Branton estate this morning when he was making an arrest there. A child, and it’s critical. There’re some ugly noises coming from the estate as we speak. Mrs. Tibb could easily lose her deposit. Which reminds me, did your wife manage to talk to you yesterday? I’m sure she thinks I’m hiding you under my petticoats.’

 

LOCK UP YOUR DAUGHTERS – Chapter 44

Wellingborough

Saturday, 24. 07. 1993

The news from Isebrook on Saturday morning was cautiously optimistic. There were no signs of any infection. But, there were no signs of recovery either. Debbie Jones was not regaining consciousness and there was no reason to expect that she ever would. Or would not. Courtesy of the Chief Constable, the night before she’d been moved into a private ward, still connected to all the supporting machinery and with the assessment date set for the following Wednesday.

‘The assessment meaning that…’ Barbara Cunningham, who’d been alternating her self-appointment as the liaison person with the hospital with Sergeant Duncan, stopped short of completing the sentence.

‘I can imagine what that means,’ said Grant. ‘Her family should be involved.’

‘We are her family,’ said Cunningham darkly.

Which was painfully true. With one brother in jail for grievous bodily harm and the other on a submarine in the Pacific and not particularly interested, a very sick mother and a young child, there was no family to speak off.

Hartman’s office phone rang out a few times, then announced a call transfer.

‘We must stop meeting like this, Grant. People will start talking,’ Hartman complained mournfully into his mobile. The background noises suggested a vehicle in motion. ‘There hasn’t been much progress in the Asante case. Your Northampton colleagues still need to interview someone called Tibb. He’s a lecturer at the police college…’

Grant grinned in spite of himself. There was a slim chance that Tibb may reap his just desserts yet. Then he explained the need for someone to represent Debbie’s interests at the “assessment”.

‘If it’s a question of money, I’ll …’

‘I don’t think there will be any need for that, Chief Inspector,’ Hartman interrupted. ‘The Force is pretty good to its own. Of course, I can’t defend young Asante and represent his victim at the same time. I’ll pass this one on Corrigan in Loughborough. An excellent man, Corrigan. Nothing to worry about. Leave it with me.’

 

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Posted by on 16/01/2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Daily Quotes 43


TWO SIMON GRANT MYSTERIES

HIDING THE ELEPHANT – Chapter 43

Oh, yes, it happened. Such a long time ago, and yet it may have been yesterday. The rainy Easter Monday in Oxfordin 1973. People talk about shattered expectations, broken trust. But when it happens there’s nothing shattering about it. No sharp pieces cutting into the flesh, no particular pain, no drama. More like molten lead that spreads and slowly coats everything in its path.

And presiding over that process, magnificent in his oblivion, was Rudi. The big brother.

At lunchtime it was still raining and they ran all the way to the Turf as fast as Rudi’s wheezing allowed. The pub was crammed with noisy strangers with cameras and college scarves, fresh from gift shops and wrapped over their hooded anoraks.

‘Bloody tourists,’ said Rudi and set about finding them two chairs.

Rudi was considering going vegetarian so he ordered cheese pie with chips and Simon had gammon steak with a burnt ring of pineapple on top. They were both given a pile of tiny, unnaturally green peas to go with a couple of overcooked carrots.

‘You shouldn’t drink beer after all that wine you had at the flat,’ Simon warned out of a fairly recent and seemingly unforgettable experience, and Rudi agreed because he always agreed with anything anyone told him. They didn’t talk much on account of the noise and the distance between their seats, but half way through Rudi jumped on his feet with the agility of a former rugby player and claimed a just vacated table for two in the alcove next to the fireplace.

There followed an embarrassing moment. They had talked out the school gossip the night before and there didn’t seem much left to say. Simon had been hoping to tell Rudi about Celia. She was Stinky’s latest stepmother and very generous during the last half term. Stinky, Marcus Smithers, whose elder brother Rufus used to be in Rudi’s class at school, Stinky was under strict orders from Celia to bring Simon home to Somerset for at least a week that Easter break. Mr. Smithers had to be away somewhere overseas where they didn’t have Easter. Simon thought he was in love with Celia. But what was the point of telling Rudi about all that if he wasn’t into sex?

LOCK UP YOUR DAUGHTERS – Chapter 43

‘Can you ring the Hallbrook surgery?’Lynn buzzed through. ‘It’s urgent.’ She sounded worried.

‘It won’t have anything to do with Debbie,Lynn. That would be just my sister-in-law,’ he said lightly.

Just my sister-in-law. Playing the game, living a lie. How easy it all comes with practice.

‘Should you be working?’ he teased, relieved that Emma had answered the phone herself and he didn’t have to explain himself to Heather Rickman, her personal Cerberus.

‘I’m pregnant, not ill,’ she said predictably. ‘Got my message, then?’

‘Lunch?’

She chose ‘My Plaice’ even though the smell of fish made her feel sick. But the chippy held romantic memories for the two of them, she said, then reminded him that they’d had coffee there once in the room at the back that was nearly always empty. A good place to talk.

Simon could have added that their one and only meeting there nine months ago had happened three days before they become lovers and that his memories of it were not exactly happy or romantic. Another visit to the rarely used dining room of the Hallbrook fish and chips shop reminded him that he still hadn’t told her everything about himself and that he couldn’t, shouldn’t expect her to make up her mind about their joint future before she’d inspected all the skeletons in his cupboard.

This was an opportunity to make up for what he’d failed to do the first time around. Tell Emma the truth about Nicola Finsbury.

But, she didn’t come to listen. She attacked the steak and kidney pudding, the mushy peas and chips, all swimming in thick, dark brown gravy with determined urgency as if they were about to leave her plate of their own volition unless tamed. ‘I’m still sick every morning,’ she informed him. ‘Then I’m constantly hungry for the rest of the day.’

Simon couldn’t see much change in her. The loose red top and baggy jeans covered the bump completely, and her over-large eyes and lips still registered every thought she had, every sensation she experienced like fine-tuned, built-in seismographs of her very private turbulences. There was none of the much talked about introverted serenity of pregnant women about her.

‘Is that how it should be? Everything is okay?’ He felt marginal, kept on the sidelines.

She shrugged. ‘I suppose so.’ The food was disappearing fast from her plate, but she seemed to need it more than enjoy it. ‘When Pippa couldn’t track you down the night before last …’ she started.

‘I’ve got to talk to you about that. Well, not about that exactly. But, it’s connected,’ he interrupted. His insides were churning in the same way they used to when he was very little but keenly aware that Chloe’s idea of truth differed significantly from his own. ‘There are things you should know before you make your final decision about us.’

‘Oh, I’ve decided,’ she said calmly. ‘That’s what I wanted to talk to you about. There is, will be no us.’  She sounded casual, off-hand, but her cutlery stopped working.

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Posted by on 15/01/2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Daily Quotes 42


TWO SIMON GRANT MYSTERIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HIDING THE ELEPHANT – Chapter 42

Saturday night. The night after the Friday night. And after Saturday morning.

Jesus!

The meal was delicious. Emma was grateful that Mandy’s Pantry provided detailed menu cards for she wouldn’t have had a clue what each of the dishes was called or what went into it. Graham, Julian’s boyfriend, made it his business to exclaim over each plate, admire the colours and absorb the smells, then move the food around his mouth as wine connoisseurs mull the wine, detecting each herb and spice separately.

‘Graham’s in his element,’ said Julian. ‘I’m more of a fish and chips man myself.’

‘Would you believe it?! I had to drag him over. Literally,’ Pippa was repeating from time to time to no one in particular. She had said the same thing twice before at the door when they first arrived, shaking her head at Simon who stood behind her and actually looked dragged over.

‘You’re glad you came now, aren’t you, the love of my life?’ she made an uncertain attempt to sit on Simon’s knee on her way back from the toilet, but abandoned the idea in favour of another glass of wine.

Emma made it easier for him to answer by removing herself from the table. She carried the used starter plates back into their tissue-lined wicker baskets. It was such fun, the crockery Mandy’s Pantry had sent. The colours and shapes matched the food. The small sounds of crinkled paper and the clink of cutlery muffled Simon’s voice. He wasn’t talking very much anyway.

‘They won’t stay long, will they?’ Phil materialised noiselessly behind her. He whispered something inaudible into her ear and licked it with the tip of his tongue. ‘We could have done without them tonight.’ His right hand squeezed her breast and as he leaned forward towards the wine rack his hardness pressed in between her buttocks once, then again and again.

‘Down, boy! Down!’ she objected and pushed him away. Her cheeks were burning. Two thoughts flashed through her mind at exactly the same time. One, how lucky it was that Simon was sitting with his back to the sideboard. The other, that this new antiperspirant she’d used didn’t live up to the adverts.

 

LOCK UP YOUR DAUGHTERS – Chapter 42

The last thing he’d expected was to find Pippa peering through the window into the intensive care ward. She wore a simple blue T-shirt and jeans, and there was a long-handled bag he didn’t recognise hanging off her shoulder. The short, honey coloured hair looked freshly washed, the wisps flying in all directions as she turned her head to inspect another end of the ward.

Unaware that she was watched, she looked very still, deeply absorbed and painfully young. There was none of the thirty-four years old poise about her. The corridor was too dark to tell from a distance if her always carefully, skilfully applied makeup was in place.

‘I thought I might find you here,’ she said softly when he walked up. ‘Why?’

‘I’ve been hoping to get something more than ‘holding her own’ from that lot,’ he pointed at a male nurse inside who was filling in the bed chart.

‘Why did she ask for you, I mean?’ Pippa wasn’t looking at him, but wasn’t looking at the bed either. ‘Why you? They phoned, a DI phoned last night and said you were desperately needed. Why? Hasn’t she got a boyfriend? Or family? How come you’re the closest she’s got?’

Absurdly, that wasn’t that far off the truth. Except for perhaps Matthew, or maybe the child Melissa, there was no one Debbie would have asked for. She’d learned never to count on Tibb. Matthew was for fun, Melissa a responsibility rather than comfort. And that left only himself.

‘She didn’t,’ he said flatly. ‘Debbie’s never asked for anyone. She hasn’t regained consciousness at all. Rav Singh, the DI who phoned home, was just passing a message from the Chief Super. He wants me to head this…’ He stopped and tried intercepting a tall, dangly, elderly man in a khaki coloured coat before he disappeared behind the double door. ‘What can you tell me…’

‘Nothing at all,’ said the man curtly. ‘I collect the urine samples.’

 

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Posted by on 14/01/2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Daily Quotes 41


TWO SIMON GRANT MYSTERIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HIDING THE ELEPHANT – Chapter 41

Emma waits for a few minutes and then, as noiselessly as she is able, she presses the door handle. There’s no light on the landing, only the moonlight pouring in from the window above the stairwell. The men are gone. She tiptoes to the stairs thanking providence for the softness of her trainers and the solid floor under her feet. All she can see down below is a bright lit patch of the terra-cotta tiled hall floor and the legs of an overturned chair. She bends over, listening. There’s nothing other than  thumping of her blood in her ears. If she crept down just a few steps, just to the first bend…

A hand clamps her jaw firmly upwards and an arm lifts her off the floor. Her feet are dangling, unable to kick, until she’s dropped back onto the bedroom floor and steadied into position.

‘Don’t you ever dare do this again or else we’ll remove you immediately. Do you understand?’

Emma nods.

‘There will be a lot of people climbing in through this window soon. The cherry-picker has been removed and they’ll be using just the ropes. It’ll be very quick. Keep out of the way. And make sure if you patient wakes up that he doesn’t start screaming. Do you understand?’ The zip that he opened earlier to take out the pink beaker is still undone down to the middle of his chest.

‘Yes. I understand.’

The door is closing behind the soft dark overall again.

‘Sorry,’ she says but he’s gone.

 

LOCK UP YOUR DAUGHTERS – Chapter 41

‘I’ve been through it over and over again,’ said Singh with a sigh. ‘There’s nothing here that should cause so much grief.’

‘Debbie was meeting Tibb at the building site last night. What has he got to say for himself?’

‘I know,’ Singh nodded. ‘Jones was discovered by a courting couple after midnight last night. Cunningham and I went out when the call came. There were quite a few of us there, as you can imagine. Even PCI Procter turned up but by that time Debbie had already been taken away in the ambulance. The commotion woke up the Tibbs and they came out in their sleepwear. Barbara tells me that Tibb asked her on the quiet to interview them separately so Karen wouldn’t suspect that he’d had anything to do with it…’

‘If Tibb had something to do with it Karen will be the least of his problems,’ Grant exploded.

‘According to Barbara, Karen’s never the least of anyone’s problems,’ Singh smiled. ‘Anyhow, she ended up interviewing the wife and I was left with Tibb. He says, and his wife’s statement corroborates his, he says that his only offence is that he’d stood Debbie up. He’d assumed Karen was going to go to her choir practice and he was going to meet Debbie as agreed. And she did, Karen went to the choir practice but she needed help with boxes of sheet music and someone’s cello and something else. It’s all in Barbara’s notes, how all those items got to be in Karen Tibb’s custody. Tibb didn’t have a good excuse not to, so he gave his wife a lift, still hoping to be back in time for his assignation. Only, those things never run smoothly so he got roped into helping out some more at the Baptist Church Hall. All in all, he was over an hour late. He said he’d looked for Debbie, hoped that she waited, but she wasn’t there.’ Singh hesitated a little. ‘It’s understandable that he wasn’t exactly searching the site, isn’t it? I mean … well … who would have thought that she’d be lying unconscious at the bottom of the drain trench by the foundation wall…’

‘Certainly not Tibb,’ Grant retorted sharply. And unfairly.

 

Kindle UK: http://amzn.to/shZvJq

Kindle US: http://amzn.to/scZ1cw

Kindle DE:http://amzn.to/uHmp8q

Kindle FR: http://amzn.to/uRu02G

Kindle ES: http://bit.ly/unx9jU

Kindle IT: http://bit.ly/tC4zd

Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/98125

 
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Posted by on 13/01/2012 in Uncategorized

 

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