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The Next Big Thing


Read Faith Helen Mortimer’s wonderful Next Big Thing interview at http://www.faithmortimerauthor.com/5/post/2012/11/queenie-for-a-day.html

mirabooks

The Blog Chain: The Next Big Thing

Thank you Mary T. McGuire http://mtmcguire.co.uk/2012/10/17/the-next-big-thing/ for including me in this blog chain.

THE INTERVIEW

Q. What is the working title of your book?

A. The current working title, For The Love Of Honey, is also The Final Title. But, for quite a while I called it The Governess. I still like that but it doesn’t reflect the content enough to serve the purpose.

Q. Where did the idea come from for the book?

A. For The Love Of Honey is the third book in the Simon Grant Mysteries series. To some extent, it’s rooted in the first two mysteries. It picks up on two or three themes that haven’t been quite resolved before. But, it also has a discrete identity of its own.

Q. What genre does your book fall under?

A. Psychological Murder Mystery

Q. Which actors would…

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Posted by on 21/11/2012 in Uncategorized

 

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The Next Big Thing


The Blog Chain: The Next Big Thing

Thank you Mary T. McGuire http://mtmcguire.co.uk/2012/10/17/the-next-big-thing/ for including me in this blog chain.

THE INTERVIEW

Q. What is the working title of your book?

A. The current working title, For The Love Of Honey, is also The Final Title. But, for quite a while I called it The Governess. I still like that but it doesn’t reflect the content enough to serve the purpose.

Q. Where did the idea come from for the book?

A. For The Love Of Honey is the third book in the Simon Grant Mysteries series. To some extent, it’s rooted in the first two mysteries. It picks up on two or three themes that haven’t been quite resolved before. But, it also has a discrete identity of its own.

Q. What genre does your book fall under?

A. Psychological Murder Mystery

Q. Which actors would you choose to play your characters in a film rendition?

A. Ah, well, now we’re talking.

Some ten years ago Colin Firth would have been perfect for the part. My current cast of recurring characters:

Rupert Penry Jones as DI Simon Grant:

Michelle Dockery as Pippa Martin (Simon Grant’s wife)

Michelle Dockery-AES-078311.jpg

Emily Blunt as Emma Martin (sister-in-law):

Emily Blunt-ALO-128790.jpg

–      James D’Arcy as Philip Martin (Emma’s husband)

James Darcy-LMK-057714.jpg

Vanessa Redgrave as Eve Hamilton Grant (mother):

Vanessa Redgrave-ALO-002573.jpg

John Bird as Adam Hamilton Grant (father)

John Bird

Stephen Fry as Rudi Hamilton Grant (brother):

Stephen Fry-ALO-121550.jpg

Others may include Saoirse Ronan, David Suchet, scores of others.  My books are densely populated. They could keep most of the British actors in work for years.
Q. What is the one-sentence synopsis of your book?

A. Why should Secret Service feel sufficiently threatened by an elderly gynaecologist and a policeman’s wife to kill them?

Q. Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency?

A. Self-published.
Q. How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript?

A. A long, long time. I write slowly at the best of times. On top of that, when I reached about 40,000 words mark I realised that one of my central characters had outgrown their motivation/back story.  So, it was back to square one. Such recoveries are very difficult because a major character tends to seep into all the others, their actions and reactions as well as dominate the overall feel and tone of the story. The storyline remained fairly intact but the way it was told had to be drastically changed. I’m still at it.
Q. What other books would you compare this story to within your genre?

A.  Hmmm… My books are often compared to the works of John Le Carre and P. D. James. But that’s the overall style, not the content. By format they are police procedurals in the good old British tradition.
Q. Who or What inspired you to write this book?

A. I’ve always liked mysteries. With the exception of well researched historical novels, that’s the only genre that appeals to the brain rather than senses and emotions. Only, I’m a little bit like a child and its toys. I like stripping my toys to pieces to see what’s inside, what makes them tick. That’s what I do with my characters and the stories are strongly character-driven.
Q. What else about your book might pique the reader’s interest?

A. All the three stories are told from two different but complementary points of view. The third book, For the Love of Honey, also employs some other ways of telling the story.

Please visit the following blogs and webpages

http://www.faithmortimerauthor.com/5/post/2012/11/queenie-for-a-day.html

http://casutton.tripod.com/cazutt/

http://slpiercebooks.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/the-next-big-thing-blog-hop.html

http://jcallenbooks.weebly.com/

http://www.amazon.co.uk/James-A.-Anderson/e/B004DANB0Y/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1351070554&sr=1-2-ent

http://www.amazon.com/Rebecca-Stroud/e/B00460RZMQ/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

http://pathester.wordpress.com

 
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Posted by on 24/10/2012 in Uncategorized

 

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Daily Quotes 21


TWO SIMON GRANT MYSTERIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hiding the Elephant – Chapter 21

‘The Boss has sent out a message,’ Debbie whispers hoarsely. ‘Oh, my God…’ Her hand is on her throat.

Emma tries to swallow, there’s nothing, and her eyes water from the dryness and the effort not to make a noise.

‘Play it again,’ says the woman Emma had seen talking earnestly to Leon Lewis when Tully first brought her here.

‘Play it again, Sam,’ someone on the left ventures predictably with a nervous giggle, but gets no response.

The silence is sliced by

Peeeng, peeeng, ping

Ping, ping, peeeng, peeeng

Peeeng, peeeng, ping, peeeng, peeeng…

A crackly pause in the recording, then again

Peeeng, peeeng, ping

Ping, ping, peeeng, peeeng

Peeeng, peeeng, ping, peeeng, peeeng…

And again.

It sounds like a half hearted attempt at a xylophone.

‘That’s Morse code!’ Emma didn’t mean to say anything at all, and certainly not as loudly.

‘Yes, we know that, thank you, Dr. Martin. You don’t pay your rates for nothing.’ Lewis’ head pops up from behind one of the screens. ‘You wouldn’t happen to know what it says as well, would you?’

Emma shakes her head, smiling at him for he’s just joking. He’s got to be. They’ll decode the signal in a flash and it will tell them all they wanted to know to end this dreadful wait. Simon has given them the vital clue, as they do in books and films, and in a minute it’ll be all action stations, all go. They’ll move quickly but orderly, daring but organised, efficient but caring. It will all start happening. In a minute.

‘It may not say anything,’ says someone Emma can’t see and Lewis nods.

‘Probably doesn’t,’ he confirms aloud for the benefit of everyone around and no one seems to disagree. How can they not disagree with something so absurd? Why would Simon send out a message at probably great peril to himself if it doesn’t say anything?

Lock Up Your Daughters – Chapter 21

Rerun of the security tapes on Friday morning showed a tall, probably quite young, most likely male person in a hooded black jacket, black shell-suit trousers and light coloured trainers quickly walk away from the police staff parking area at 09.21 on Thursday morning. It was reasonable to assume they were looking at the tyre-slasher, even though the camera failed to record him or her in action.

‘It’s the angle, Sir,’ said Sergeant Duncan. ‘You left your car right bang in the middle of the blind spot.’

‘Is no one keeping an eye on unauthorised access?’ Grant bellowed in frustration. ‘This is a police station, not a cash-n-carry, for crying out loud.’ The video recorder was in the downstairs conference room and his voice echoed through its emptiness.

‘Exactly so, Sir.’Duncanused the time away from the front desk to light up. ‘Do you know how many undercovers and plain clothes from all over pass through in a day?’ He used his cupped palm to shake off the ash. ‘No, neither do I but it’s far too bloody many to keep asking everyone their business before they actually come into the building. Robin Carr came in dressed as a stripogram at about two in the morning last night. Cheered up the night relief no end. She said she had more indecent proposals in between the staff car park and the canteen than on the assignment. Who could have it in for you, Sir?’

‘Just about half of Wellingborough, one third of the entire county and very possibly all of Branton.’

‘Well, that narrows it down pretty nicely.’Duncanwalked away to enjoy the rest his cigarette in peace.

Grant rewound the tape and looked it over once again. The size of the trainers and the height of the person indicated a man. The back of a tall, fast walking young man dressed in black. A needle in the haystack.

‘Someone for you at the desk, Sir. And there’s a Mrs. Hopkins on the phone. Says she’s your neighbour. Will you take it in my office?’

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Posted by on 14/12/2011 in Uncategorized

 

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